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Radiometric dating uses

Knowing the rate of decay of one nuclear species (nuclide) into another, scientists can, in principle, use the ratios of decay products as a clock to measure the...

During the 1950s and ’60s, isotopic dating of rocks showed that the crystalline massifs of Precambrian age (from about 4 billion to 541 million years ago) found on opposite sides of the South Atlantic did indeed closely correspond in age and composition, as Wegener had surmised.

It is now evident that they originated as a single assemblage of Precambrian continental nuclei...

..to the extent of about 100 parts per million (ppm) in tektites—far below the value for terrestrial igneous or sedimentary rocks.

Much information about tektite history is obtained by radioisotopic dating; the ages cited above for the tektite strewn-fields were found by potassium-argon dating.

As a result of their longevity, they are still present in meteorites and on Earth, and they are commonly used for dating rocks and meteorites.

Radioactive elements in the Earth, the Moon, and in meteorites can provide useful information about the ages of these objects and about the dates of formation of the heavy elements themselves.

His estimate came into question after the discovery of naturally occurring radioactivity by the French physicist Henri Becquerel in 1896 and the subsequent recognition by his colleagues, Marie and Pierre Curie, that compounds of radium (which occur in uranium minerals)...

Another role of isotopic geochemistry that is of great importance in geology is radiometric age dating. Beginning with studies in the 1950s, a much better chronology and record of Pleistocene climatic events have evolved through analyses of deep-sea sediments, particularly from the oxygen isotope record of the shells of microorganisms that lived in the oceans.

...igneous activity (both extrusive and intrusive) occurred in the Caledonian mountain belt, which stretched from New England, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Scotland, and Scandinavia to eastern Greenland.

Radiometric dating of granitic intrusions associated with the Caledonian orogeny yields ages between about 430 million and 380 million years.

The elements uranium and thorium gradually decay into lead, different isotopes of lead arising from the various isotopes of uranium and thorium; some isotopes of lead are, however, not produced by any...